Climate Change Fiction contest

This comes by way of kathytemean.wordpress.com who has the most informative blog for writers and illustrators.

Everything Change Climate Fiction Contest 2018

The Everything Change Climate Fiction Contest, presented by the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative at Arizona State University.

We are looking for stories that illustrate, explore, or illuminate the impact of climate change on humanity and/or the Earth. We enthusiastically invite submissions in all genres of short fiction, including speculative, realistic, literary, experimental, hybrid forms, and more. Work will be selected and judged by Kim Stanley Robinson, The New York Times bestselling author of Shaman, the Mars trilogy, and New York 2140. The winning story will receive a $1000 prize, and nine finalists will receive $50 prizes. Selected work will be published in an anthology by the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative at Arizona State University.

Submission Guidelines

Submit up to one (1) work of short fiction with a maximum length of 5,000 words.

Your submission must be under 5,000 words and contain no identifying information anywhere within the document.

Submissions that exceed 5,000 words or contain any identifying information about the author will be disqualified.

Submissions must be original work that has not been previously published in-print or online.

While the presence of other languages in the text is acceptable, the majority of the work must be written in English.

Participants must be 18 years or older. U.S. and international submissions are welcome. ASU students and employees are welcome to participate.

The deadline for the submission is February 28, 2018. Our judging process will be blind: judges will not have access to any identifying information about the authors, including their names, places or origin, or ages.

To read Everything Change: An Anthology of Climate Fiction, which collects the grand prize winner and finalists from our 2016 contest, visit http://climateimagination.asu.edu/everything-change.

To learn more about the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative, visit http://climateimagination.asu.edu.

Submission Guidelines

• Submit up to one (1) work of short fiction with a maximum length of 5,000 words.

• Your submission must be under 5,000 words and contain no identifying information anywhere within the document.

• Submissions that exceed 5,000 words or contain any identifying information about the author will be disqualified.

• Submissions must be original work that has not been previously published in-print or online.

• While the presence of other languages in the text is acceptable, the majority of the work must be written in English.

• Participants must be 18 years or older. U.S. and international submissions are welcome. ASU students and employees are welcome to participate.

The deadline for submission is February 28, 2018. Our judging process will be blind: judges will not have access to any identifying information about the authors, including their names, places or origin, or ages.

Additional Things to Consider

• Imagining Climate Futures: Your submission in some way should illustrate or explore the impact of climate change on humanity and/or the Earth, in the present or the near- or moderate-term future.

• Scientific Accuracy and Understanding: Your submission in some way should reflect current scientific knowledge about climate change, though you have full artistic freedom to exaggerate, embellish, and invent fictional conditions and situations.

• Climate Challenges, Human Responses: Your submission may illuminate and invite reflections on a climate-related challenge that individuals, communities, organizations, or societies face today, or might face in the near- or moderate-term future. Examples include (but are not limited to) daily decisions and behaviors, policy-making and politics, strategy and planning, moral responsibility to the future, investment in R&D or technologies, and public health issues.

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Upcoming Victoria Children’s Literature Roundtable

Where do picture book ideas come from?

I love kisses.

I’ll bet that you do too!

Wake up sleepyhead kisses

Raspberry jam and bread kisses…

One of the things I enjoyed about being a teacher was sharing books with my students. And, I loved reading to my own children just as much. These days, I am fortunate to live close to my three grandchildren. I can’t think of anything better than having one of them crawl into my lap for a kiss, a snuggle and a story. In fact, a raspberry jam and bread kiss from one of my grandchildren was the inspiration for I Love Kisses…actually, it was a raspberry jam and toast kiss, but bread worked with sleepyhead whereas toast…just didn’t.

So, if you are looking for a book to share with a child you love, I hope you’ll keep I Love Kisses in mind.💕💕💕💕

Xmas arrived early for me

In case you are looking for a special Xmas present for a family you love 💗 Canadian Materials (volume XXIV Number 4…September 29, 2017) recently reviewed Waiting for the Whales. Happy 26th birthday to my first book which continues to be highly recommended.

“Be sure to add this gentle but captivating story to your picture book collection. Waiting for the Whales will remain a favorite to reread for generations to come.”

Recommended Xmas Reads

Check out Margriet Ruurs’ blog for some great Xmas reads to share with the family at http://margrietruurs.blogspot.ca

Island Santa is one of several titles recommended.

Island Santa, Sheryl McFarlane, Sheena Lott, ISBN 9-780988-053601 is a beautiful story based on the real Santa Ship that visits the Gulf Islands in BC where I live. McFarlane combined this with the real story of Jeneece Edroff who fundraised to make a home for families of sick children a reality near Victoria’s General Hospital.

Check out: https://islandkidsfirst.com/jeneece-place/

Victoria Children’s Literature Roundtable Eventu

Future Writers

I haven’t done a ton of school visits lately; just too busy with house renovations, grandchildren and recouping from a knee injury. But, today I enjoyed a lovely visit to Willows, the elementary school that is a few short blocks from home. I had a fabulous time with Ms. Kremler and Ms. Dennison’s grade four students. They had some great ‘what if’ ideas, came up with some pretty amazing metaphors and similes, and had more than a few very astute questions.

Yep, I may just have met a future writer or two today.

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